Royals

'Mother Nature has sent us to our rooms': Sarah Ferguson shares poignant message on Covid-19

''She gave us time and she gave us warnings. She was so patient with us... but in the end she took back control,'' the Duchess of York has said.

Sarah Ferguson has shared a poignant message about Covid-19 on social media, suggesting that Mother Nature had given us time and warnings to "clean up our mess" but lost patience with us and sent us to our rooms while she took back control and did it herself.
"Mother Nature has sent us to our rooms.. like the spoilt children we are," she has said.
In her message, the Duchess of York wrote, "She gave us time and she gave us warnings. She was so patient with us. She gave us fire and floods, she tried to warn us but in the end she took back control.
"She has sent us to our rooms and when she is finished clearing up our mess. She will let us out to play again. How will we use this time? xxxx"

Since countries around the world have gone into lockdown to stem the global pandemic a number of beautiful phenomenons have already occurred, albeit in the face of terrible tragedy.
In Italy, which has been worst hit by the virus, the waterways have begun to clear. You can now see fish in the Venice canals, usually muddied due to so many passing boats disturbing the sediment on the bottom. Dolphins have been popping up along parts of the coast they usually avoid and ducks were spotted playing in the fountains in Rome.
Air pollution has fallen in a number of cities, including New York and in China, which was once choked by smog.
However, McGill University associate professor and epidemiologist Jill Baumgartner has told the New York Times people shouldn't get too excited just yet.
"It's not a sustainable way to reduce air pollution, and the long-term economic and well-being impacts of this crisis are going to be devastating for many people."
Similarly, experts have pointed out that the Venice canals are not cleaner, just clearer.
But it's a start, and it has given many hope.

The princess and fiancé Edoardo Mapelli Mozzi had planned to marry at St James Palace in London on May 29 and hold their reception in the gardens of Buckingham Palace. The reception was to be hosted by the Queen.
But that has been cancelled and with the world now in lockdown and the Queen herself expected to be in isolation for several weeks at Windsor Castle after Prince Charles tested positive for Covid-19, what was to be the royal social event of 2020 is now well and truly stuck in limbo.
The duchess is not the only royal to have taken to social media to address the Covid-19 pandemic.
In a video shot by the countess' eldest child Lady Louis, 16, she said: "For parents and carers, it can be a daunting time to help our children and young people through this period of uncertainty, but please don't feel alone.
"Make use of the resources out there and the fantastic digital communities that are sharing them and supporting them. Stay safe and thinking of you all."

The Queen shared a personal letter of solidarity last week saying that "at times such as these, I am reminded that our nation's history has been forged by people and communities coming together to work as one, concentrating our combined efforts with a focus on the common goal."

She continued: "[Philip and I] are enormously thankful for the expertise and commitment of our scientists, medical practitioners and emergency and public services; but now more than any time in our recent past, we all have a vitally important part to play as individuals – today and in the coming days, weeks and months.
"Many of us will need to find new ways of staying in touch with each other and making sure that loved ones are safe. I am certain we are up to that challenge. You can be assured that my family and I stand ready to play our part," she concluded, signing the letter, "Elizabeth R".
The message, shared to the Royal Family's social media accounts, was also shared by the Cambridges and the Sussexes and follows their own messages encouraging people to support one another.