Royals

Prince Harry reveals how many children he wants to have with Duchess Meghan

The new father interviewed primatologist Dr Jane Goodall for the September issue of British Vogue, where they got candid about the environment, responsibility and climate change.

By Anya Truong-George
It's been an exciting week for the Duchess of Sussex, who announced on Monday that she had Guest Edited the upcoming September issue of British Vogue – the most anticipated issue of the year.
Included on the cover and within the issue – coined 'Forces for Change' – are a number of 'trailblazing' women from a range of disciplines; however Meghan's not the only member of the royal family who had a helping hand in the issue.
Keen to lend his support, Meghan's husband Prince Harry conducted a candid interview with ethologist Dr Jane Goodall to feature in the issue, where he got candid about the environment, responsibility and climate change and also revealed how many children he'd like to have with Meghan.
Prince Harry and primatologist Dr Jane Goodall have met several times before. (Image: Getty)
During their exclusive sit-down at Windsor the pair talked about the earth's quickly diminishing natural resources and the threat to our future generations.
"We are the one species on this planet that seems to think that this place belongs to us and only us," Harry said.
Dr Goodall agreed, saying humans will continue to war over natural resources if things don't change and paints a bleak picture of the future, particularly if, like Harry and Meghan, you've just welcomed a child into the world.
"It does make it different, doesn't it?" Dr Goodall asked Harry.
Harry agreed saying: "I think, weirdly, because of the people that I've met and the places I've been fortunate enough to go to, I've always had a connection and a love for nature.
"I view it different now, without questions. But I've always wanted to try and ensure that, even before having a child and hoping to have children…"
"Not too many!" joked Dr Goodall.
"Two maximum!" Harry replied.
"But I've always thought: this place is borrowed. And, surely, being as intelligent as we all are, or as evolved as we all are supposed to be, we should be able to leave something better behind for the next generation."
The Duke and Duchess of Sussex's official Instagram, Sussex Royal, has also shared photographs taken by royal photographer Chris Allerton during their interview.

Prince Harry and Dr Goodall have met several times before, in fact just last week the pair met up again at the Roots & Shoots Global Leadership Meeting at Windsor Castle, a global programme founded by Dr Goodall in 1991.
The programme aims to empower young people through hands-on projects to action to make the world a better place for people, animals and the environment.
Following their meeting Dr Goodall also revealed she met with Duchess Meghan in June – which we can assume was when her British Vogue interview with Prince Harry took place – and it was then that Meghan revealed she had been a big fan of the legendary primatologist for years.
"She told me she's followed me all her life," Dr Goodall shared.
"She told me, 'You've been my idol since I was a child.' I've hero worshipped all my life."
She even got in a cuddle with baby Archie, describing the almost three-month-old as "very cute and very gentle."
WATCH: Duchess Meghan and Jacinda Ardern both star in British Vogue's 'Forces for Change' video. Story continues below...
The September issue of British Vogue is set to hit stands on August 2nd, however snippets of what readers can expect from the upcoming issue have already been revealed including a Q&A Duchess Meghan conducted with former US First Lady Michelle Obama and of course the striking cover.
The cover features black and white portraits of 15 'change making' women, including New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern, transgender actor and campaigner Laverne Fox and Swedish 15-year-old climate change activist Greta Thunberg.
Explaining her vision for the cover the Duchess revealed she "chose a diverse selection of women from all walks of life, each driving impact and raising the bar for equality, kindness, justice and open mindedness.
"The sixteenth space on the cover, a mirror, was included so that when you hold the issue in your hands, you see yourself as part of this collective."

British Vogue's Editor-in-Chief Edward Enninful further revealed some of the behind-the-scenes discussions about the cover saying while there had been talks about Meghan gracing the cover herself, in the end she declined, feeling "it would be in some ways a 'boastful' thing to do with this particular project."
"She wanted, instead, to focus on the women she admires."
He adds: "To have the country's most influential beacon of change guest edit British Vogue at this time has been an honour, a pleasure and a wonderful surprise.
"As you will see from her selections throughout the magazine, she is also willing to wade into more complex and nuanced areas, whether they concern female employment, mental health, race or privilege.
"From activists, politicians to performers, poets to provocateurs, British Vogue and HRH The Duchess of Sussex have chosen women from the frontline of fashion, film, tech, wellness and beyond to celebrate a special moment in time, calling it Forces For Change."