Celebrity News

Celebrities who are Scientologists

From Elisabeth Moss to Laura Prepon, these are the celebrities you might not have known were Scientologists.
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Though Leah Remini is no longer a Scientologist, the former King of Queens actress is still majorly publicising Scientology today by condemning the controversial religion with her A&E show, Leah Remini: Scientology and the Aftermath.

Since the star’s series has again brought attention to Scientology, we’re taking a look at all the celebrities — including Tom Cruise, Kirstie Alley, and more — still practicing L. Ron Hubbard’s teachings in 2017.

Keep scrolling to see who else in Hollywood is a member of Scientology.

Tom Cruise:: The Top Gun star was first introduced to Scientology back in 1990 through his first wife, actress Mimi Rogers. After struggling with dyslexia as a child, Tom has reportedly credited the religion with helping him overcome the reading disability. Since joining Scientology, Tom has become one of the organisation’s most famous and outspoken members and has worked as an impassioned Scientology advocate for many years.

Scientology has also allegedly influenced Tom’s romantic relationships in the past. In 2013, the star claimed his third ex-wife, Katie Holmes, divorced him to protect their young daughter, Suri Cruise, from the religion. Neither Katie nor Suri are practicing Scientologists today.

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Tom Cruise and James Corden play out Mission Impossible movies

John Travolta and Kelly Preston: John first joined Scientology in 1975 after he was given the book ‘Dianetics’ while filming the movie The Devil’s Rain in Mexico. The Grease star’s wife is thought to have joined the religion when she met her now-husband John in 1987.

When John and Kelly tragically lost their son Jett at age 16 in 2009, the actor spoke out about how Scientology helped him cope with his child’s death. “Oh, my god, I wouldn’t have made it [without the church’s support]. Honestly. The truth is, I didn’t know if I was going to make it. Life was no longer interesting to me, so it took a lot to get me better. I will forever be grateful to Scientology for supporting me for two years solid, I mean Monday through Sunday,” he said.

Kirstie Alley: The former Cheers star was raised as a Methodist but became a Church of Scientology member in 1979. Kirstie reportedly joined the religion to help her overcome a cocaine addiction and subsequently completed a Scientology-affiliated drug treatment program. Since then, she has continued her Scientology training, once allegedly donated $5 million to the church, and has spoken out against former friend Leah’s public criticism of Scientologists.

Juliette Lewis: The actress interestingly identifies herself as both a Christian and a Scientologist. “I think there’s so much confusion because people don’t understand a religion where you can be another religion but you can still practice Scientology. That’s why it’s completely progressive. It’s just tools for living. It’s about understanding one’s self and others and compassion and how to communicate better and how to live in this troubled society. It’s really basic, common sense stuff. It has nothing to do with all this funny folklore that surrounds it. You could be a Jewish Scientologist or a Buddhist Scientologist or a Christian Scientologist or anything else,” Juliette said in a 2010 interview.

Jenna Elfman: Jenna was born a Catholic and became a Scientologist when she met her husband, actor Bodhi Elfman — who first practiced Judaism — in the early 1990s. The actress has since credited Scientology with sustaining her marriage to Bodhi. After Leah left Scientology, Jenna took to Twitter to defend her association with the religion and denounce Leah’s statements against the organisation.

“What is important to me? I give a damn about making the world a better place. I care about seeing others smile with genuine happiness. I think the world needs more of that. I’m not interested in sensationalism. I’m interested in seeing other people do well. And spreading kindness, warmth, and sincerity. I never forget to appreciate the absurd. And I find it uplifting to admire what’s right in others. I also find it pleasurable to be totally ridiculous,” she wrote at the time.

Nancy Cartwright: The voice of cartoon character Bart Simpson often uses her ‘Bart voice’ as part of a robocall (recorded telephone message) encouraging people to attend Scientology events.

Nancy was raised as a Roman Catholic but joined the Church of Scientology in 1991. She has since donated millions of dollars to the church for which she was awarded Scientology’s Patron Laureate Award after donating $10 million, almost twice her annual salary.

Laura Prepon: The Orange is The New Black star has been a Scientologist since 1999. According to an in-depth article with [Celebrity Magazine](, (the celebrity magazine of choice for all scientologists) her long-time affiliation with the church has brought only positivity as she explains to Celebrity magazine “honestly, I’ve become more me” . When discussing her scientology commitment, Prepon draws upon terms such as ‘personal values”, “integrity” and “overcoming ups and downs”. Since joining. she has been climbing the Scientologist ladder, in what they describe as ‘audits’ ever since.

Elisabeth Moss: Mad Men and Handmaid’s Tale star Elisabeth Moss was introduced to Scientology by her family and since has been a passionate member of the church. The in-demand actor has come to the defence of Scientology accusations, most recently in an Instagram comment where she rejected the comparison of The Handmaid’s Tale to Scientology. An interview with The Telegraph revealed that for Elisabeth, Scientology centres her the way yoga centres other people. Moss further explains that Scientology is different to regular religions in that “It’s self-applied, involves reading and you have to make a choice.”

Giovanni Ribisi: The American actor, best known for his roles in Saving Private Ryan, Boiler Room and Avatar has been an active member of the Church of Scientology for his entire life. Ribisi explained to online magazine radar that, simply put, the religion “works” for him, and advised interested parties to “go pick up a book.”

This article originally appeared on our sister site, Closer Weekly

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